23 C
Mossel Bay
21st Aug 2019
Nature & Nurture

Have you spotted the Brunsvigia orientalis?

Well, we’ve had lots of holidays and now we’re really into autumn and fast approaching winter. These stunning Brunsvigia orientalis plants flower in late February/March after the first significant rain but only if there is unpaved, unmowed land for them to survive on. For this reason if we’re lucky we see them on road verges. There were some in Fraai Uitsig in the Mossel Bay area, and also in the railway reserve and lots near the Wild Oats Market in Sedgefield. Equally important is to allow the leaves, which come up after the flowers die, to grow over winter to feed the bulb for next year’s flowers.

Unfortunately they will become scarcer and scarcer because of the trend to totally flatten and denude plots before building, and then to pave the entire property, often including the road verge. The irony is that people buy in our areas because they like the uncitified feel and then destroy the natural vegetation.

Lately the Mossel Bay Municipality has been appealing to residents to take measures to attenuate the storm water run-off from their properties…it’s closing the door after the horse has bolted! The issue needs to be addressed before planning permission is granted and there need to be laws governing how much of a property can be built on, how much hard surfacing can be laid down and what happens to the huge amount of water that comes off the roofs, and into the streets, or neighbouring properties. We are all responsible for nurturing the remaining fauna and flora in our neighbourhoods.

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